French engineers launch Cheezam app that uses AI to identify different cheeses from a single photo

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Brilliant news for cheese lovers! French engineers launch Cheezam app that uses AI to identify different cheeses from a single photo

  • Cheezam was inspired by popular music search app Shazam
  • He compares the photos to his database of 9,000 images of different cheeses
  • It seeks to identify key characteristics, including the size and shape of the mold
  • Cheezam is currently only available in France, and it’s unclear when or if it will be rolled out to cheese lovers around the world.

There’s nothing more boring than indulging in a delicious cheese platter in a restaurant, only to then forget what varieties are in front of you.

But the days of scrambling to find the menu could be a thing of the past, thanks to a new app called Cheezam.

Cheezam was inspired by the music search app Shazam and uses artificial intelligence (AI) to identify different cheeses from a single photo.

Users simply take a photo of the cheese they would like to identify, and within seconds a range of suggestions will appear.

Cheezam was inspired by music search app Shazam and uses artificial intelligence (AI) to identify different cheeses from a single photo

£240,000 robot chef can whip up the perfect CHEESE FONDUE

Served in a simmering pot with a selection of dipping ingredients, cheese fondue is undoubtedly one of the most popular dishes among cheese lovers around the world.

Now the famous Swiss dish can be prepared, stirred and served by a robot chef.

A Swiss team is working on Bouebot, the robotic creation bringing a futuristic touch to an alpine tradition.

The robot cost up to £240,000 ($325,000) to develop.

Users simply take a photo of a cheese they would like to identify, and within seconds a range of suggestions will appear.

The Cheezam app works by comparing photos against its database of 9,000 images of different cheeses.

It seeks to identify key characteristics, including the size and shape of the mould, and the way the specks are arranged in the cheese.

Speaking to Liberation, Isabelle Mashola, CEO of Isahit, which has annotated thousands of cheeses for the app, explained how the algorithm works.

“Let’s take a Fourme d’Ambert and a blue,” she said.

“For the algorithm to be able to determine the photo, it must be given indications which are provided in the form of annotations.

‘On a marbled cheese, for example, you will notice that the spots are arranged in this way.

“The algorithm will then make the effort to recognize this feature by comparing it to other pre-annotated images.

“And that’s how we manage to narrow the math down to the right cheese.”

Cheezam’s answer will always be hypothetical and allow for a margin of error, Mashola added.

In addition to answers, the app also gives users wine pairing suggestions - perfect for a cheese and wine night.

In addition to answers, the app also gives users wine pairing suggestions – perfect for a cheese and wine night.

For example, in response to a photo of a cheese with starry greenish spots, the app suggests that there’s a 95% chance it’s Fourme d’Ambert and a 5% chance it’s Blue of the Causses.

In addition to answers, the app also gives users wine pairing suggestions – perfect for a cheese and wine party!

At this early stage, Cheezam developers encourage users to report any errors, so they can improve the app.

Cheezam is currently only available in France, and it’s unclear when or if it will roll out to cheese lovers around the world.

Speaking to MailOnline, a data.ai spokesperson said: ‘Cheezam, a French cheese detection app launched in April 2022, has had 8.1,000 cumulative downloads on iOS and 4.2,000 cumulative downloads on the Google Play Store in France as of May 8, 2022.’

However, it has already been warmly received by cheese lovers on Twitter.

One user tweeted: “I can’t do more French tech than that. Shazam for cheese. Recommend some wine to go with it.

Another added: ‘Did you think the US or China was ahead in AI? France has just produced an application capable of instantly recognizing any cheese.

And one of them joked: “It is very likely that we have reached a peak of evolution.”

Why cheese and wine go so well together: Fatty foods interact with chemicals in wine and mask unwanted flavors, study finds

We all know that food is best paired with wine to deliciously complement the flavors of a meal.

Now French scientists have proven that the reverse is also true: fats in food interact with compounds in wine to improve the taste of the drink.

The researchers explored how lipids – fatty molecules abundant in cheese, meat, vegetable oils and other foods – interact with tannins in grapes.

Tannins are a group of bitter, astringent compounds found naturally in plants, seeds, bark, wood, leaves, and fruit skins, including grapes.

Scientists say that tannins enlarge lipids, accentuating their taste and masking their unwanted bitter taste.

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